Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Mars Had Ice Sheets Billions of Years Ago and a Volcano Erupted There – Life on Mars?

Image Source.
NASA just released an article about an ancient volcano that erupted beneath an ice-covered Mars. 

Granted, within awakening circles, NASA's credibility has waned, but the fact remains, the space agency still has a sway over the public, and as such, any announcements they make should be considered carefully. 

NASA already made acknowledged that water exists on the 4th planet from the Sun, which is the first step toward the recognition of the possibility of life there. 

Related NASA: ET Life On Mars Likely | Salty Water Flows on Mars Today, Boosting Odds for Life

And we know from several whistleblowers that Mars apparently has a vast ecosystem of native life, albeit different than what we find here on Earth. 

Related Cosmic Disclosure Season 2 - Episode 8: Finding Life on Mars - Summary and Analysis | Corey Goode and David Wilcock

The following article is a bit obscure, but it suggests that Mars was once covered by ice, which is, of course, a prerequisite for water-based life forms. 

Science has already confirmed the existence of huge wetlands under the ice in Antarctica, which makes the announcement of ice once covering Mars one step closer to the discovery of life there.  

Related Science Confirms: Giant "Wetlands" Exist Beneath the Ice in Antartica – A Good Location for ET or Secret Military Bases?

In the below article, researchers discovered mineral deposits that suggest the ice caps of Mars once decended some 1000 miles form the polar reigons, almost five times larger than the currant size of only 220 miles. 

If this much ice existed in the past it suggests that water was once abundant there.

Again, all of this seems to be part of a soft or limited disclosure agenda, which can be used to help awaken the minds of the sleeping masses. 

Related Lower Level SSP Group Broke Away from SSP Alliance Council, Intends on Pushing Partial Disclosure and Inner-Earth Anshar to Begin Contact with Surface

But to be sure, the whole truth is much more complex and involved than what is being released from so-called official channels. 

Related David Wilcock and Corey Goode: History of the Solar System and Secret Space Program - Notes from Consciousness Life Expo 2016
- Justin

SourceJPL Nasa

Graphic Caption - This graphic illustrates where Mars mineral-mapping from orbit has detected a few minerals -- sulfates (blue) and iron oxides (pink) -- that can indicate where a volcano erupted beneath an ice sheet.

The site is far from any ice sheet on modern Mars, in oddly textured terrain where the shapes of flat-topped mountains had previously been recognized as a possible result of ancient subglacial volcanism. Researchers used the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) to check surface composition in the area, and their findings strengthen the evidence for volcanic eruptions that burst through a cover of ice.

These mountains are in a region called Sisyphi Montes. In this graphic, the base image shows a portion of the region about 130 miles (230 kilometers) across, centered at 17.73 degrees east longitude, 63.46 degrees south latitude. Red outlines indicate possible subglacial volcanic structures. CRISM data are presented in the overlay box at upper right, with an indication of the ground area covered by this CRISM observation. The color key at upper left shows how the spectrometer data correspond to presence of sulfates and iron oxide minerals, which are characteristic of subglacial volcanism sites on Earth.

The base map uses imaging from the Thermal Imaging System (THEMIS) camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter. CRISM is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Building and operating CRISM has been led by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland. THEMIS was supplied by and is operated by Arizona State University, Tempe. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Mars Odyssey projects for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built both orbiters.

Found: Clues about Volcanoes Under Ice on Ancient Mars

Volcanoes erupted beneath an ice sheet on Mars billions of years ago, far from any ice sheet on the Red Planet today, new evidence from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter suggests.

The research about these volcanoes helps show there was extensive ice on ancient Mars. It also adds information about an environment combining heat and moisture, which could have provided favorable conditions for microbial life.

Sheridan Ackiss of Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, and collaborators used the orbiter's mineral-mapping spectrometer to investigate surface composition in an oddly textured region of southern Mars called "Sisyphi Montes." The region is studded with flat-topped mountains. Other researchers previously noted these domes' similarity in shape to volcanoes on Earth that erupted underneath ice.

"Rocks tell stories. Studying the rocks can show how the volcano formed or how it was changed over time," Ackiss said. "I wanted to learn what story the rocks on these volcanoes were telling."

When a volcano begins erupting beneath a sheet of ice on Earth, the rapidly generated steam typically leads to explosions that punch through the ice and propel ash high into the sky. For example, the 2010 eruption of ice-covered Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland lofted ash that disrupted air travel across Europe for about a week.

Characteristic minerals resulting from such subglacial volcanism on Earth include zeolites, sulfates and clays. Those are just what the new research has detected at some flat-topped mountains in the Sisyphi Montes region examined with the spacecraft's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), providing resolution of about 60 feet (18 meters) per pixel.
"We wouldn't have been able to do this without the high resolution of CRISM," Ackiss said.
The Sisyphi Montes region extends from about 55 degrees to 75 degrees south latitude. Some of the sites that have shapes and compositions consistent with volcanic eruptions beneath an ice sheet are about 1,000 miles (about 1,600 kilometers) from the current south polar ice cap of Mars. The cap now has a diameter of about 220 miles (about 350 kilometers).

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project has been using CRISM and five other instruments on the spacecraft to investigate Mars since 2006. The project is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, for the agency's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, provided and operates CRISM. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the orbiter and supports its operations.

NASA has three active orbiters and two rovers at Mars that are advancing knowledge about the Red Planet that is useful in planning future missions that will take humans there.


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