Thursday, January 16, 2014

Is industrial hemp the ultimate energy crop?

If we take all the data about Cannabis, Hemp, and Marijuana, its industrial uses, and medical applications, there are some big questions that come to mind. 

How is it that Industrial Hemp can remove toxins from fields and rejuvenate the soil, while at the same time yielding an amazing raw material which can be applied to seemingly any industry? How is it that our human tech, the body, has an entire system which perfectly harmonizes with THC? The Endocannabinoid system?


Finally, our human genome has about 200 genes that are totally foreign to planet Earth. Despite the myth that new genes are create via random mutation, this has NEVER been observed in modern science, nor has there EVER been a new species or gene created in the over 500 years of breeding in western record keeping. 


What does all this mean? To me, there is a strong probability, that Cannabis was either created by ancient megalithic human cultures for its societal and medical uses, or it was created by our space brothers to help us on Earth. I think given the available data, this is the most likely source of the Cannabis planet; despite modern sciences willful ignorance regarding the mechanics of Genes and their actual role on earth. 



- Justin

Source - Removing the Shackles


Did you know that the US first President George Washington grew Hemp?


By the way, did you know that the US Government/corporation owns all the patents on medical cannabis cures and treatments?

Hemp is one of the ultimate renewable resources of our planet. From paper, to fabric, to bio fuel, to medicine,......


60 WAYS TO USE YOUR HEMP

and another article of interest in the hemp arena

http://removingtheshackles.blogspot.com/2013/05/hemp-could-free-us-from-oil-prevent.html


Original Article HERE: http://theconversation.com/is-industrial-hemp-the-ultimate-energy-crop-20707

2 January 2014, 7.45pm GMT

Is industrial hemp the ultimate energy crop?


Author

Thomas PradePostdoctoral Researcher at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences 


Bioenergy is currently the fastest growing source of renewable energy. Cultivating energy crops on arable land can decrease dependency on depleting fossil resources and it can mitigate climate change…




Disclosure StatementThomas Prade receives funding from the Swedish Farmers' Foundation for Agricultural Research, the EU commission, the Skåne Regional Council and Partnership Alnarp.
The Conversation is funded by the following universities: Aberdeen, Birmingham, Bradford, Bristol, Cardiff, City, Durham, Glasgow Caledonian, Goldsmiths, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Nottingham, The Open University, Queen's University Belfast, Salford, Sheffield, Surrey, UCL and Warwick.
It also receives funding from: Hefce, Hefcw, SAGE, SFC, RCUK, The Nuffield Foundation, The Wellcome Trust and The Alliance for Useful Evidence 

Using industrial hemp for the production of bioenergy
has been promoted by enthusiasts for a long time. Shutterstock

Bioenergy is currently the fastest growing source of renewable energy. Cultivating energy cropson arable land can decrease dependency on depleting fossil resources and it can mitigate climate change.
But some biofuel crops have bad environmental effects: they use too much water, displace people and create more emissions than they save. This has led to a demand for high-yielding energy crops with low environmental impact. Industrial hemp is said to be just that.

Enthusiasts have been promoting the use of industrial hemp for producing bioenergy for a long time now. With its potentially high biomass yield and its suitability to fit into existing crop rotations, hemp could not only complement but exceed other available energy crops.

Hemp, Cannabis sativa, originates from western Asia and India and from there spread around the globe. For centuries, fibres were used to make ropes, sails, cloth and paper, while the seeds were used for protein-rich food and feed. Interest in hemp declined when other fibres such as sisal and jute replaced hemp in the 19th century.

Abuse of hemp as a drug led to the prohibition of its cultivation by the United Nations in 1961. When prohibition was revoked in the 1990s in the European Union, Canada and later in Australia, industrially used hemp emerged again.

This time, the car industry’s interest in light, natural fibre promoted its use. For such industrial use, modern varieties with insignificant content of psychoactive compounds are grown. Nonetheless, industrial hemp cultivation is still prohibited in some industrialised countries like Norway and the USA.
Energy use of industrial hemp is today very limited. There are few countries in which hemp has been commercialised as an energy crop. Sweden is one, and has a small commercial production of hemp briquettes. Hemp briquettes are more expensive than wood-based briquettes, but sell reasonably well on regional markets.

Large-scale energy uses of hemp have also been suggested.

Biogas production from hemp could compete with production from maize, especially in cold climate regions such as Northern Europe and Canada. Ethanol production is possible from the whole hemp plant, and biodiesel can be produced from the oil pressed from hemp seeds. Biodiesel production from hemp seed oil has been shown to overall have a much lower environmental impact than fossil diesel.
Indeed, the environmental benefits of hemp have been praised highly, since hemp cultivation requires very limited amounts of pesticide. Few insect pests are known to exist in hemp crops and fungal diseases are rare.

Since hemp plants shade the ground quickly after sowing, they can outgrow weeds, a trait interesting especially for organic farmers. Still, a weed-free seedbed is required. And without nitrogen fertilisation hemp won´t grow as vigorously as is often suggested.

So, as with any other crop, it takes good agricultural practice to grow hemp right.

Hemp has a broad climate range and has been cultivated
 successfully from as far north as Iceland to warmer, more tropical regions. Flickr: Gregory Jordan
Being an annual crop, hemp functions very well in crop rotations. Here it may function as a break crop, reducing the occurance of pests, particularly in cereal production. Farmers interested in cultivating energy crops are often hesitant about tying fields into the production of perennial energy crops such as willow. Due to the high self-tolerance of hemp, cultivation over two to three years in the same field does not lead to significant biomass yield losses.

Small-scale production of hemp briquettes has also proven economically feasible. However, using whole-crop hemp (or any other crop) for energy production is not the overall solution.

Before producing energy from the residues it is certainly more environmentally friendly to use fibres, oils or other compounds of hemp. Even energy in the fibre products can be used when the products become waste.

Recycling plant nutrients to the field, such as in biogas residue, can contribute to lower greenhouse gas emissions from crop production.

Sustainable bioenergy production is not easy, and a diversity of crops will be needed. Industrial hemp is not the ultimate energy crop. Still, if cultivated on good soil with decent fertilisation, hemp can certainly be an environmentally sound crop for bioenergy production and for other industrial uses as well.




Source:


http://removingtheshackles.blogspot.com/2014/01/is-industrial-hemp-ultimate-energy-crop.html

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